Stalker (1979)

Сталкер or Stalker is another science fiction film from Russian/Soviet Director Andrei Tarkovsky. With this film I’ve watched all the ‘important’ Tarkovsky films. Now this is movie is a bit different from the others, it is based on the novel Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. Scholars have written that this film encapsulates Tarkovsky’s world view “the rift between natural science and belief, the future of mankind in view of current atomic threats; and, ultimately, the dim glimmer of hope still left to man.” One of my favorite stories about the film is that after being told that Stalker should be faster and more dynamic, Tarkovsky replied that “the film needs to be slower and duller at the start so that the viewers who walked into the wrong theatre have time to leave before the main action starts.” This film like Solaris has a Western cousin in Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. Spoilers to follow

Stalker is set sometime in the future and there is a “Zone” which is a mysterious place sealed off by the government and inside the Zone is a Room which supposedly has the ability to fulfill a person’s innermost desires. So a Stalker (Alexander Kaidanovsky) offers to guide a pair of gentlemen, a Writer (Anatoly Solonitsyn) and a Professor (Nikolai Grinko), into the Zone and to the Room. They evade the military and get into the Zone and a world of color, as outside the zone the film has a sepia tint. Inside the Zone we learn that it is a very complex maze of traps and that Stalkers are needed to safely navigate through. Some have pointed that the journey to the Room can be seen as a search for knowledge or a pilgrimage of faith. The Writer wants to visit the Room as he has lost his inspiration and The Professor is said to want to write a scientific analysis of the Zone with the hope to win a Noble Prize.  However when they get to the antechamber of the Room a phone rings, and there is confusion about this but here the Professor changes his tune he has been carrying a bomb with him to blow up the room  so no evil man would use it.

One could look at the film as a sort of conversation about the necessity of something greater in your life, there are twists an turns that you can’t explain but with something/one guiding you it get easier. This can come in different shapes and everyone will see it differently I find that that the Room has some sort of confessional or just plain prayerful vibe as that is what people do when they pray ask for things. Sure being made in Soviet Russia according to Tarkovsky the Room and Zone meant nothing.

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